PIRATES
HOME
PIRATES
History
PIRATE
LINKS
PIRATE
RECIPES
PIRATE
DRINKS
PIRATE
JOKES
PIRATE
BOOKS
PIRATE
STORE
September 19th each and every year is:
International Talk Like A Pirate Day
Pirate Related
Pirate Food Recipes • Pirate Fun Facts
Pirate Drink Recipes • Pirate Jokes
Pirate Costume Store • Pirate Home
Shop Pirates • Pirate Books • 
Pirate Fun Facts • Hard Tack   
Party Planning Tips!
 • Party Planning • Weird Holiday Parties
 • Types of Parties • Theme Parties
 • Types of Party Games • Parlor Games
 • Party Food Recipe & Ideas • 
 • Table Setting for Dinner • 
"Pirates have been around as long as people have used the oceans as trade routes."  
"The great or classic era of piracy in the Caribbean extends from around 1560 up until the mid 1720s. The period during which pirates were most successful was from 1700 until the 1730s. Many pirates came to the Caribbean after the end of the War of the Spanish" Succession. "
Home  /  Content: Types of Holidays  /  Site Info  /  Feedback Form  /  Terms of Use  /  E-  Greetings  /  Calendar Store   /  Thank You!  /  Hot Links
Pirate Food!
Gone-ta-pott.com
Gone-ta-pott.com
A place to discover Holidays
   you didn't know existed!
Calendar
Store
Holiday Cookbooks
Photo: 
Follow Me on Pinterest
Follow on Twitter
Find on Facebook
Our Pinterest
Our Blog
Bacon Hot Dog
Send Free Greeting
Recipes
Southern Banana Pudding
National Creamsicle Day
Types of Burgers
Party Articles
Traditional
Holiday Foods
Talk like a Pirate Day
Pirates
Social Events
Harvest Festival
What did Pirates eat and drink? When I think of Pirates I think of one eyed men eating meat with knives and sopping up sauce with their fingers, snarling under their breath while walking around with a goblet of rum in their hand. hahaha!  
....................................................................................................................................................................
This may have been how it was the first few weeks at sea 

because meat and rum was plentiful but the rest of the voyage was not 
so plentiful. In fact the food that was available further into the voyage 
was a bit scarce and a bit on the rotten and gross side of things; unless 
they lucked up on stealing food from a ships galley after a raid. Utensils 
were not exactly the fashion on a ship either; so if you're thinking about 
men eating with their fingers most of the time, you would be right.

• Pirate Food Recipes    • Pirate Drink Recipes
​....................................................................................................................................................................

The first couple of weeks at sea was full of meat, cheese, fresh veggies, eggs, and you name it.  After that the food slowly but surely started to spoil, rot, mold and go rancid. That's why most of the food in storage was either dry beans, pickled food or salted food like salted meat. The quality and variety of the food was certainly found lacking after a few months at sea. Chickens were kept for the eggs until they were eaten or died. Cows were kept for the milk until the food supply for the cow had depleted.  When the cow no longer had food to live, it was then time to eat the cow.

The meat was frequently rotten and it was very common to see maggots.  The bread was full of weevils, even the hardtack sea biscuits which usually lasted for up to 12 months if kept dry.  Pirates were known to catch a sea turtle here and there which was a welcomed meal.  Bones from everything was kept to make Pirate Bone Soup for when the going got rough.

Galley cooks were known to use a lot of herbs and spices to cover up the taste of spoiled ingredients. Vegetables and meat were usually pickled or salted to preserve the food.  Ships on long voyages relied on biscuits, dried beans and salted beef to live. Without proper food, many sailors got sick and died of scurvy.

    Now, having said all that; it must also be said that in the Mediterranean Sea, ships were never far from a pirate haven, the crew would land as often as possible and could stock up on food - they could also eat and drink as much as they wanted while on land.
​.....................................................................................................................................................................













































.....................................................................................................................................................................

See all full recipes in our Pirate Recipes section
Meatpie (16th century)
O´Hanlons stew (Irish 16th century style)
Honey Cake (Swedish, early 17th century)
Stuffed hen (late 16th century)
Salmagundi
...................................................................................................................................................................

Here's an example of the standard allotment of food
for a week at sea:

4 pounds of salt beef
2 pounds of salt pork
2 pints of peas
3 pints of oatmeal
6 ounces of butter
12 ounces of cheese

There was also a daily allotment of a pound of bread and a gallon of beer (or some other type of alcohol depending on the availability). Rum was also a very popular drink item for sea goers.  

Other variations included once a week flour, suet (beef fat) and currants or raisins being issued so a "duff" could be made as prevention against scurvy. 
....................................................................................................................................................................

Example of a ships Provisions as noted in the
London Gazette - August 1768
.....Provisions now stowed in the hold of Endeavour as she starts her long journey include nine thousand pounds of flour, four thousand pieces of beef, six thousand pieces of pork, twenty bushells of salt, and nearly eight thousand pounds of Sour Krout, which Lieutenant Cook proposes to use as a Preventative to scurvy. In addition, there is livestock consisting of seventeen sheep, five fowls, four ducks, a boar, sow and piglets, and a goat to supply milk for the Officers. Lieutenant Cook proposes to replenish supplies with fish at sea, and fruit, animal life and water at various landfalls........
.................................................................................................................................................................... 

The ship's galley
The ship's galley is the ships kitchen and was usually not much more than a fireplace with a few cauldrons to cook in and maybe a spit to roast meat on. A cook had to be very clever, and very resourceful, to create decent meals for the crew in such difficult circumstances.
.....................................................................................................................................................................

Are you having a pirate party and your looking for suggestions on what fun theme food to serve? Here's some suggestions for you.

Shop: Pirate Featured Products
 • Pirate Costume Store / Pirate Books & History / 
 • Pirate Computer & Video Games / Pirate skull & cross bone Flags 
 • Pirate DVD Movies / Pirates Music / Pirate Food
 • Visit our Pirate Store - Click Here
Navigation:
Sour Krout / Sour Kraut / Saucerkraut
Sour Krout (Sauerkraut pronounced / (ˈsaʊrkraʊt, 
German … The word comes directly from the 
German language , which literally translates to sour
 cabbage.) … was a common dish found on ships 
and was prepared in the German manner, with 
water and salt. Sour Krout would keep for a long 
time and part of it's popularity was because it would 
prevent scurvy.  Sea water was actually used to boil
 the cabbage to make the Sour Krout. 
 • See sauerkraut recipe
​................................................................................

Bombo / Bumboo
They drank bombo or bumboo, a mixture of rum, 
water, sugar, and nutmeg.  Rumfustian was 
another popular drink that blended raw eggs with 
sugar, sherry, gin, and beer.  Pirates also enjoyed beer, sherry, brandy, and port.
 • See More Pirate Drink Recipes
.............................................................................................................................................................

Salted Meat: 
"Salted meat was a staple of the mariner's diet in the Age of Sail. It was stored in barrels, and often had to last for months spent out of sight of land. The basic Royal Navy diet consisted of salted beef, salted pork, ship's biscuit, and oatmeal (see National Oatmeal Month or porridgerecipe),
supplemented with smaller quantities of peas, cheese and butter.  Even in 1938, Eric Newby found the diet on the tall ship Moshulu to consist almost entirely of salted meat. Moshulu's lack of refrigeration left little choice as the ship made voyages which could exceed 100 days passage between ports."
• See salted meat
............................................................................................................................................................

Hard Tack or (better know as Sea Biscuits by sea goers)
Hard Tack was a pirates bread- it was used during long sea voyages and eaten along side of stews & soups like Bone Soup. Sea Biscuits were usually dunked in water, brine, coffee, broth (or some other liquid) ; floated on top of soup so it could soak up the liquid of the soup, or placed on top of food cooking in a skillet meal.

Example Recipe
Read the full story about Hardtack / Sea Biscuits
Pirate
Store
SHOP
Navigation: