Add this page to your favorites.
Ash Wednesday!
In the Western Christian calendar (wikipedia)
"Ash Wednesday is the first day of Lent and occurs forty-six days (forty days not counting Sundays) before Easter. It falls on a different date each year, because it is dependent on the date of Easter; it can occur as early as February 4 or as late as March 10."

"Ash Wednesday gets its name from the practice of placing ashes on the foreheads of the faithful as a sign of repentance. The ashes used are gathered after the Palm Crosses from the previous year's Palm Sunday are burned. In the liturgical practice of some churches, the ashes are mixed with the Oil of the Catechumens (one of the sacred oils used to anoint those about to be baptized), though some churches use ordinary oil. This paste is used by the minister who presides at the service to make the sign of the cross, first upon his or her own forehead and then on those of congregants. The minister recites the words: "Remember (O man) that you are dust, and to dust you shall return", or "Repent, and believe the Gospel."

Ritual
"At Masses and services of worship on this day, ashes are imposed on the foreheads of the faithful (or on the tonsure spots, in the case of some clergy). The priest, minister, or in some cases officiating layperson, marks the forehead of each participant with black ashes in the shape of a cross, which the worshipper traditionally retains until it wears off. The act echoes the ancient Near Eastern tradition of throwing ashes over one's head to signify repentance before God (as related in the Bible). The priest or minister says one of the following when applying the ashes:

   Remember, O man, that you are dust, and unto dust you shall return.
   —Genesis 3:19

   Turn away from sin and be faithful to the Gospel.
   —Mark 1:15

   Repent, and hear the good news.
   —Mark 1:15

"The ashes used in the service of worship or Mass are sacramentals, not a sacrament. The ashes are blessed according to various rites proper to each liturgical tradition, sometimes involving the use of "Holy Water". In some churches they are mixed with light amounts of water or olive oil, which serve as a fixative."

"In most liturgies for Ash Wednesday, the Penitential psalms are read; Psalm 51 (LXX Psalm 50) is especially associated with this day. The service also often includes a corporate confession rite."

"In some of the free church liturgical traditions, other practices are sometimes added or substituted, as other ways of symbolizing the confession and penitence of the day. For example, in one common variation, small cards are distributed to the congregation on which people are invited to write a sin they wish to confess. These small cards are brought forth to the altar table where they are burned."

"In the Roman Catholic Church, ashes, being sacramentals, may be given to any Christian, as opposed to Catholic sacraments, which are generally reserved for church members, except in cases of grave necessity. Similarly, in most other Christian denominations ashes may be received by all who profess the Christian faith and are baptized."

"In the Roman Catholic Church, Ash Wednesday is observed by fasting, abstinence from meat, and repentance—a day of contemplating one's transgressions. The Anglican Book of Common Prayer also designates Ash Wednesday as a day of fasting. In other Christian denominations these practices are optional, with the main focus being on repentance. On Ash Wednesday and Good Friday, Roman Catholics between the ages of 18 and 59 are permitted to consume only one full meal, which may be supplemented by two smaller meals, which together should not equal the full meal. Some Roman Catholics will go beyond the minimum obligations demanded by the Church and undertake a complete fast or a bread and water fast. Ash Wednesday and Good Friday are also days of abstinence from meat (for those Catholics age 14 and over), as are all Fridays in Lent. Some Roman Catholics continue fasting during the whole of Lent, as was the Church's traditional requirement, concluding only after the celebration of the Easter Vigil."

"As the first day of Lent, Ash Wednesday comes the day after Shrove Tuesday or Mardi Gras (Fat Tuesday), the last day of the Carnival season."

Biblical significance
"Ash Wednesday is a day of repentance and it marks the beginning of Lent. Ashes were used in ancient times, according to the Bible, to express mourning. Dusting oneself with ashes was the penitent's way of expressing sorrow for sins and faults. An ancient example of one expressing one's penitence is found in Job 42:3-6. Job says to God: "I have heard of thee by the hearing of the ear: but now mine eye seeth thee. Wherefore I abhor myself, and repent in dust and ashes." (vv. 5-6, KJV) Other examples are found in several other books of the Bible including, Numbers 19:9, 19:17, Jonah 3:6, Matthew 11:21, and Luke 10:13, and Hebrews 9:13. Ezekiel 9 also speaks of a linen-clad messenger marking the forehead of the city inhabitants that have sorrow over the sins of the people. All those without the mark are destroyed."

"It marks the start of a forty day period analogous to the separation of Jesus in the desert to fast and pray. During this time he was tempted. Matthew 4:1-11, Mark 1:12-13, and Luke 4:1-13."

"In Victorian England, theatres refrained from presenting costumed shows on Ash Wednesday, so they provided other entertainments, such as those shown on the program at right, from February 14, 1872 at the Gaiety Theatre, London."

Denominations observing Ash Wednesday
These Christian denominations are among those that mark Ash Wednesday by holding a service of worship or Mass:

"The Eastern Orthodox Church does not in general observe Ash Wednesday; instead, Orthodox Great Lent begins on Clean Monday. There are, however, a relatively small number of Orthodox Christians who follow the Western Rite; these do observe Ash Wednesday, although often on a different day from the previously-mentioned denominations, as its date is determined from the Orthodox calculation of Pascha, which may be as much as a month later than the Western observance of Easter."

See also
__________________________________________________________________

See Also
Easter /Ash Wednesday / Palm Sunday  / Good Friday / Clean Monday-Pure Monday / Holy Week
Major Holidays  / Movable Holidays / Spring / Clean Monday-Pure Monday  / Holy Week
Carnival  / Lent / National Egg Month  / Movable Feasts /

Shop: Kids & Family Easter Store!
Have you ever wished for a classic Easter special to show your kids? Here Comes Peter Cottontail is a Rankin & Bass production that bears a marked similarity to the beloved Santa Claus Is Coming to Town.
______________________________________________________

Resources: This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses some material from Wikipedia/article Easter Eggs/and other related pages. Top Photo : Eggs
Major Holidays
EasterNew YearsChristmas
Mother's DayFather's DayThanksgiving  Valentines DaySt. Patrick's Day Halloween  • July 4thMemorial
Labor DayVeterans DayFlag Day
Major HolidaysMovable Holidays
A look into Related Holidays
Ash Wednesday / Palm Sunday  / Good Friday
Clean Monday-Pure Monday  / Holy Week
Carnival  / Lent / National Egg Month  /
Easter Related Pages
Picture of a cross of ash on a worshipper's forehead on Ash Wednesday.
Photograph by Gareth Hughes.
Monthly Holidays
January  /  February
March  /  April  /  May
June  /  July  /  August
September  /  October
November  /  December

Types of Holidays
Federal Holidays
Federal Observance
Hallmark Holidays
International Observ
Major Holidays
Movable Holidays
Nationwide Observ
Proclamation Holidays
State Holidays
Types of Holidays
Unofficial Holidays

Holiday Categories
Animal Holidays
Career Holidays
Craft&Hobby Holidays
Dance Holidays
Drink Holidays
Food Holidays
Fruit Holidays
Game Holidays
Garden Holidays
Health Awareness
Literature Holidays
Personality Holidays
Religious Holidays
Romantic Holidays
Spooky Holidays
Supernatural Holidays
Weird Holidays

Calendar Related
Astronomy
Birthstones / Month
Daylight Saving Time
Flower of the month
Friday the 13th
Full Moon Day
Zodiac Signs
The Four Seasons
Todays Birthday
Horoscope

Be Entertained
Games
Headline News
Today In History
Trivia Tournament
Daily Bible Verse
Color Test

Home  /  Site Info  /  Feedback Form  /  Aboutus.org  / Terms of Use  /  Privacy Policy  /  Hot Links
Our Video Clips  /  Calendar Directory  /  Calendar Store   /  Blogger  /  Send Greeting Cards  / Thank You!

Copyright 2004 & Up / Gone-ta-pott.com - All rights reserved.
:
Flower of the Month
Types of Salads
Ash Wednesday is a moveable feast, occurring 46 days before Easter. It fell on February 6 in 2008 and on February 25 in 2009. In future years Ash Wednesday will occur on these dates:
2010 - February 17
2011 - March 9
2012 - February 22
2013 - February 13
2014 - March 5
2015 - February 18
2016 - February 10
2017 - March 1
2018 - February 14
2019 - March 6

Gone-ta-pott.com
Gone-ta-pott.com
"Your Holiday Directory"