Cheeses of the World
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  Cheese Cheese Cheese!
What is Cheese?
"Cheese is a food consisting of proteins and fat from milk, usually the milk of cows, buffalo, goats, or sheep. It is produced by coagulation of the milk protein casein. Typically, the milk is acidified and addition of the enzyme rennet causes coagulation. The solids are then separated and pressed into final form. Some cheeses also contain molds, either on the outer rind or throughout."

"Hundreds of types of cheese are produced. Their different styles, textures and flavors depend on the origin of the milk (including the animal's diet), whether it has been pasteurized, the butterfat content, the species of bacteria and mold, and the processing including the length of aging. Herbs, spices, or wood smoke may be used as flavoring agents. The yellow to red color of many cheeses is a result of adding annatto. Cheeses are eaten both on their own and cooked in various dishes; most cheeses melt when heated."

"For a few cheeses, the milk is curdled by adding acids such as vinegar or lemon juice. Most cheeses are acidified to a lesser degree by bacteria, which turn milk sugars into lactic acid, then the addition of rennet completes the curdling. Vegetarian alternatives to rennet are available; most are produced by fermentation of the fungus Mucor miehei, but others have been extracted from various species of the Cynara thistle family."

Cheese has served as a hedge against famine and is a good travel food
"It is valuable for its portability, long life, and high content of fat, protein, calcium, and phosphorus. Cheese is more compact and has a longer shelf life than the milk from which it is made. Cheesemakers near a dairy region may benefit from fresher, lower-priced milk, and lower shipping costs. The long storage life of cheese allows selling it when markets are more favorable."




















"The Celtic root which gives the Irish cáis and the Welsh caws are also related."

"When the Romans began to make hard cheeses for their legionaries' supplies, a new word started to be used: formaticum, from caseus formatus, or "molded cheese" (as in "formed", not "molded"). It is from this word that we get the French fromage, Italian formaggio, Catalan formatge, Breton fourmaj and Provençal furmo. Cheese itself is occasionally employed in a sense that means "molded" or "formed". Head cheese uses the word in this sense."

Factors which are relevant to the categorization of cheeses include:
Length of aging, Texture, Methods of making, Fat content, Kind of milk, Country/Region of Origin

List of common categories
"No one categorization scheme can capture all the diversity of the world's cheeses. In practice, no single system is employed and different factors are emphasised in describing different classes of cheeses. This typical list of cheeses includes categories from foodwriter Barbara Ensrud."

Fresh, Whey, Pasta filata, Semi-soft, Semi-firm, Hard, Double and triple cream, Soft-ripened
Blue vein, Goat or sheep, Strong-smelling, Sharp, Processed

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This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses some material from Wikipedia/article    cheese and other related pages. Top Photo: homestead stock
Food Holidays
Cheese Related Holidays!
National Grill Cheese Sandwich Month: April / recipes
National Cheese Day: June 4 / National Dairy Month: June
National Cheese Fondue Day: April 11 / Fondue recipes
National Cheese Ball Day: April 17 / Cheese Ball Recipes
National Frozen Yogurt Day: June 4 /
Etymology
"The origin of the word cheese appears to be the Latin caseus, from which the modern word casein is closely derived. The earliest source is probably from the proto-Indo-European root *kwat-, which means "to ferment, become sour"."

"In the English language, the modern word cheese comes from chese (in Middle English) and cīese or cēse (in Old English). Similar words are shared by other West Germanic languages — West Frisian tsiis, Dutch kaas, German Käse, Old High German chāsi — all of which probably come from the reconstructed West-Germanic root *kasjus, which in turn is an early borrowing from Latin."

"The Latin word caseus is also the source from which are derived the Spanish queso, Portuguese queijo, Malay/Indonesian Language keju (a borrowing from the Portuguese word queijo), Romanian caş and Italian cacio."
Cheese Related Pages
Cheese Fun Facts / Cheese Definitions / Cheese Game
Cheese Recipes / Cheese Soup Recipes / Cheesecake
Favorite Cheesy Resources
Common Meals
BreakfastSecond BreakfastBrunch
Champagne BreakfastLunchDinner  • Supper
Tea (meal): Afternoon TeaHigh Tea
Cheese Game
SHOP Cheese!
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