Cookie Classifications: Types Of Cookies!
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This page is dedicated to all Cookie Holidays!
History
"Cookie-like hard wafers have existed for as long as baking is documented, in part because they deal with travel very well, but they were usually not sweet enough to be considered cookies, by modern standards."

"Cookies appear to have their origins in 7th century AD Persia, shortly after the use of sugar became relatively common in the region. They spread to Europe through the Muslim conquest of Spain. By the 14th century, they were common in all levels of society, throughout Europe, from royal cuisine to street vendors."

"With global travel becoming widespread at that time, cookies made a natural travel companion, a modernized equivalent of the travel cakes used throughout history. One of the most popular early cookies, which traveled especially well and became known on every continent by similar names, was the jumble, a relatively hard cookie made largely from nuts, sweetener, and water."

"Cookies came to America in the very first century of English settlement (the 1600s), although the name "koekje" arrived slightly later, with the Dutch. This became Anglicized to "cookie". Among the popular early American cookies were the macaroon, gingerbread cookies, and of course jumbles of various types."

"The most common modern cookie, given its style by the creaming of butter and sugar, was not common until the 18th century."
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Cookies are broadly classified according to how they are formed, including at least these categories:

Dropped Cookies:
Drop cookies are made from a relatively soft dough that is dropped by spoonfuls onto the baking sheet. During baking, the mounds of dough spread and flatten. Chocolate chip cookies (Toll House cookies), oatmeal (or oatmeal raisin) cookies and rock cakes are popular examples of drop cookies.

Rolled Cookies:
Rolled cookies are made from a stiffer dough that is rolled out and cut into shapes with a cookie cutter. Gingerbread men are an example.

Pressed Cookies:
Pressed cookies are made from a soft dough that is extruded from a cookie press into various decorative shapes before baking. Spritzgebäck are an example of a pressed cookie.

Refrigerator Cookies:
Refrigerator cookies are made from a stiff dough that is refrigerated to become even stiffer. The dough is typically shaped into cylinders which are sliced into round cookies before baking.

Molded Cookies:
Molded cookies are also made from a stiffer dough that is molded into balls or cookie shapes by hand before baking. Snickerdoodles and peanut butter cookies are examples of molded cookies.

Bar Cookies:
Bar cookies consist of batter or other ingredients that are poured or pressed into a pan (sometimes in multiple layers), and cut into cookie-sized pieces after baking. Brownies are an example of a batter-type bar cookie, while Rice Krispie treats are a bar cookie that doesn't require baking, perhaps similar to a cereal bar. In British English, bar cookies are known as "tray bakes".

Sandwich Cookies:
Sandwich cookies are rolled or pressed cookies that are assembled as a sandwich with a sweet filling. Fillings may be with marshmallow, jam, or icing. The Oreo cookie, made of two chocolate cookies with a vanilla icing filling is an example.

Fried Cookies:
Fried cookies including traditional cookies such as the krusczyki, rosettes and fattigmann as well as a newer American trend of deep-frying ordinary drop cookie dough.

Twice Baked Cookies

Cookies also may be decorated with an icing, especially chocolate, and closely resemble a type of confectionery.

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Cookie Recipes
Coffee Cookies
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Biscotti
Potato Chip Cookies
Checkerboard Cookies
Chocolate Chip Cookies
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About Cookies
Types of Cookies
Holiday Cookies from around the world

Resources:  This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses some material from Wikipedia/article cookies / and other related pages. Top photo:
Food Holidays
Everybody loves dunkin cookies!
"Dunking releases more flavour from confections by dissolving the sugars, while also softening their texture. Dunking can be used to melt chocolate on biscuits to create new rich flavours not tasted before."
A look into other related Holidays
National Sugar Cookie Day
October is National Cookie Month
Cookie Cutter Week: 1st week in Dec.
National Cookie Day: December 4
National Dessert Day
Common Meals
BreakfastSecond BreakfastBrunch
Champagne BreakfastLunchDinnerSupper Afternoon TeaHigh Tea
Cookie Related
Holiday Cookies from around the world
Christmas Cookies / Coffee Cookies
Halloween Cookies / Cookie Links / Biscotti
Potato Chip Cookies / Checkerboard Cookies
Cookie Mix Recipes / Chocolate Chip Cookies / Peanut ButterCookies
Cookie Baking
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