FUN FOOD FACT:  Bacon sandwich as treatment for hangovers

A study by Newcastle University found that foods high in protein—such as bacon— break down into amino acids. The combination of fat and amino acids can speed up a sluggish metabolism depleted of neurotransmitters due to overconsumption of alcohol, suggesting that a bacon sandwich can help the body lessen the effects of a hangover.
Home  /  Content: Types of Holidays  /  Site Info  /  Feedback Form  /  Terms of Use  /  E-  Greetings  /  Calendar Store   /  Thank You!  /  Hot Links
Flitch Day, the Holiday!
Gone-ta-pott.com
Gone-ta-pott.com
A place to discover Holidays
   you didn't know existed!
Calendar
Store
Holiday Cookbooks
Photo: 
Follow Me on Pinterest
Follow on Twitter
Find on Facebook
Our Pinterest
Our Blog
Bacon Butty Sandwich
Send Free Greeting
Weird Party Ideas
Bone Soup
Shocker Parties
Bacon Hot Dog
National Food Holidays
Types of Burgers
Party Articles
Traditional
Holiday Foods
Unofficial Holidays
Weird Holiday Parties
Social Events
Festival
Harvest Festival
Margarita Recipes
 "A custom of giving a flitch of bacon to any married couple who would swear that neither of them, in a year and a day, either sleeping or waking, repented of their marriage." This custom turned into a celebrated holiday. 
.......................................................................................................................................................................
SHOP
Weird Stuff!
When is Flitch day?  July 19 is Flitch Day.

What is a Flitch?
A flitch is measurement of bacon, equaling half a pig. (Flitch = side)
In the United States: A side of unsliced bacon was once known as a flitch- it is now known as a slab. An individual slice of bacon is a slice or strip.

What is this Holiday for?
An old English custom from long ago eventually turned into the holiday called Flitch Day, which is celebrated on July 19th. Every year on this day, since about 1104, any married couple who could prove they had been faithful and loving to one another for one year was awarded half a pig, known as a flitch of bacon. However, very few couples would actually "bring home the bacon!" There are still flitch trials today, but they are only held once every four years.

There are historical references to this day as far back as 1104, and it was a regular civic event in Dunmow by the late 1800's. Eventually, those who settled in America, brought the tradition with them.

Origin of this Holiday?
Our research did not find the creator, but we know that it 
does exzist because of actual events and customs in 
history. This holiday is referred to as a "National" day.  
However, we did not find any congressional records or 
presidential proclamations for this day. Even though we 
didn't, this is still a holiday that is publicized to celebrate.
So have fun with it and celebrate it!

Flitch Trials
Great Dunmow is a town in the Uttlesford district of Essex,
 England. Originally the site of a Roman settlement on 
Stane Street, the town thrived during the Middle Ages. 
Many buildings survive from this period, including a
 sixteenth century town hall.

Four-yearly ritual of the Flitch Trials
The town is famous for its four-yearly ritual of the Flitch Trials, in which couples must convince a jury of six local bachelors and six local maidens that they have never wished themselves un-wed for a year and a day. If successful the couple are paraded through the High Street and receive a flitch of bacon. The last flitch trials were held in the town in the summer of 2004, with the next scheduled for 2008. The custom is ancient, and is mentioned in the Wife of Bath's Prologue and Tale in Chaucer's The Canterbury Tales. 

Custom of Giving a Flitch of Bacon
 A custom of giving a flitch of bacon to any married couple who would swear that neither of them, in a year and a day, either sleeping or waking, repented of their marriage.

The actual words of the ancient rite
performed before a ‘judge’ in a mock court and a ‘jury’ of maidens and bachelors, require that in “twelvemonth and a day” both spouses have “not wish’t themselves unmarried again”.

The full pledge went:

    You shall swear by custom of confession,
    If ever you made nuptial trangresssion,
    Be you either married man or wife,
    If you have brawls or contentious strife
    Or otherwise, at bed or at board,
    Offended each other in deed or word:
    Or, since the parish-clerk said Amen,
    You wish’t yourselves unmarried agen,
    Or in a twelvemonth and a day,
    Repented not in thought any way,
    But continued true in thought and desire
    As when you join'd hands in the quire.
    If to these conditions, without all feare,
    Of your own accord you will freely swear,
    A whole gammon of bacon you shall receive,
    And bear it hence with love and good leave;
    For this is our custom at Dunmow well knowne,
    Though the pleasure be ours, the bacon’s your own.

The parties were to make their oath before the Prior and Convent and the whole town, humbly kneeling in the churchyard upon two hard, pointed stones. The ancient oath is still sworn today:

    We do swear by custom of confession
    That we ne’er made nuptial transgression,
    Not since we were married man and wife,
    By household brawles or contentious strife,
    Or otherwise in bed or a boarde,
    Offended each other in deed or in word,
    Or in a twelve months and a day
    Repented not in thought in any way.
    Or since the church clerke said Amen
    Wish’t yourselves unmarried agen,
    But continue true and in desire,
    As when you joyn'd hands in Holy Quire.

When this oath was taken by each couple, it was the duty of the officer who administered it to reply:

"Since to these conditions, without any fear,
Of your own accord you do freely swear,
A whole flitch of bacon you shall receive,
And bear it hence with love and good leave;
For this is our custom at Dunmow well known
Though the pleasure be ours, the bacon's your own."
...................................................................................................................................................................

Is this the origin of "bringing home the bacon"? Perhaps. 
The History of the Flitch Trials
....................................................................................................................................................................

Are you thinking of having a party or dinner to celebrate this holiday?
.....................................................................................................................................................................

Resources:
This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses some material from Wikipedia/article Flitch_Trials / and other related pages. 
.....................................................................................................................................................................
Meat Holidays To Remember!
 • National Meat Week: Last week in January
 • Meatloaf Appreciation Day: October 18
 • National Hamburger Month: May
 • National Sausage Month: October
 • International Bacon Day: Sat before laborday
 • National Hot Dog Day: July 16
 • Flitch Day, The Holiday:  July 19