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The General Roman Calendar indicates the days of the year to which the Roman Rite assigns liturgical celebrations of saints and "mysteries of the Lord" for observance everywhere............ 
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... a traditional Christian method of organizing a liturgical year by associating each day with one or more saints and referring to the day as that saint's feast day. The system arose from the very early Christian custom of annual commemoration of martysr on the dates of their deaths, or birth into heaven, and is thus referred to in Latin as dies natalis ("day of birth").

Feast of Saint Blaise
Saint George's Day
Saint David's Day
Saint Joseph's Day
Saint Patrick's Day
Saint Piran's Day
Valentine's Day
St. Martin's Day
Saint Lucy's Day
All Saints Day
Michaelmas
Saint Matthew's day

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The Calendar of Saints is...
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Fragment of a roman kalender, Museo Epigrafico, 
Rome (Foto: Kleuske)  license
​..... National and diocesan liturgical calendars, as well as those of religious institutes and even of continents, add other saints or transfer the celebration of a particular saint from the date assigned in the General Calendar to another date.

These liturgical calendars also indicate the degree or rank of each celebration: Memorial (which can be merely optional), Feast or Solemnity. Among other differences, the Gloria is said or sung at the mass of a Feast, but not at that of a Memorial, and the Creed is added on Solemnities.

The General Calendar assigns celebrations of saints to only about half the days of the year, and contains relatively very few of the saints recognized by the Roman Catholic Church, and only a fraction of those listed in the 776-page volume Roman Martyrology, which does not contain the names of all the saints legitimately venerated. The Martyrology assigns several saints to each day of the year and gives a very brief description of each saint or group of saints.

While canonization involves the addition of the saint's name to the Roman Martyrology, it does not necessarily involve insertion of the saint's name also into the General Roman Calendar, which mentions only a very limited selection of canonized saints.

Many sources give calendars that mention one or more saints for each day of the year, usually selected from those listed in the Roman Martyrology. One example is Saints by Day. They mention the saints of the General Roman Calendar, but they also give names of saints not included in the General Roman Calendar, especially on a day, known as a feria, to which the General Roman Calendar assigns no celebration whatever of a saint.

"Feria" is a Latin word that, in ecclesiastical usage, means "weekday"; more precisely, it refers in the calendar to days on which no saint is celebrated. "Ferial" is an adjective formed from "feria" and is used in connection with a noun, as in the phrase "ferial Mass".

The General Calendar is printed, for instance, in the Roman Missal and the Liturgy of the Hours. These are up to date when printed, but additional feasts may be added later. For that reason, if those celebrating the liturgy have not inserted into the books a note about the changes, they must consult the current annual publication, known as the "Ordo", for their country or religious congregation. These annual publications, like those that, disregarding the feasts that are obligatory in the actual church where the liturgy is celebrated, list only celebrations included in the General Calendar, are useful only for the current year, since they omit celebrations impeded because of falling on a Sunday or during periods such as Holy Week and the Octave of Easter.
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History
The feast days of saints celebrated in one country are not necessarily celebrated everywhere. For example, a diocese or a country may celebrate the feast day of a saint of special importance there (e.g., St. Patrick in Ireland, Our Lady of Guadalupe in Mexico, St. Elizabeth Ann Seton in the United States). Likewise, a particular religious institute may celebrate its founder or members of the institute, even if that saint is not listed on the universal calendar or is included in it only with a lower rank. The General Roman Calendar contains only those celebrations that are intended to be observed in the Roman Rite in every country of the world.

This distinction is in application of the decision of the Second Vatican Council: "Lest the feasts of the saints should take precedence over the feasts which commemorate the very mysteries of salvation, many of them should be left to be celebrated by a particular Church or nation or family of religious; only those should be extended to the universal Church which commemorate saints who are truly of universal importance."

There is a common misconception that certain saints, e.g., Saint Christopher, were "unsainted" in 1969 or that veneration of them was "suppressed". In fact, Saint Christopher is recognized as a saint of the Catholic Church, being listed as a martyr in the Roman Martyrology under 25 July. In 1969, Pope Paul VI issued the motu proprio Mysterii Paschalis. In it, he recognized that, while the written Acts of Saint Christopher are merely legendary, attestations to veneration of the martyr date from ancient times. His change in the calendar of saints included "leaving the memorial of Saint Christopher to local calendars" because of the relatively late date of its insertion into the Roman calendar.
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Variations from the following list of celebrations shall be indicated not here but, below, under the heading "National Calendars".

Moveable (General Calendar)

  • Sunday after Epiphany (or, if Epiphany is celebrated on 7 or 8 January, the following Monday): Baptism of the Lord – Feast
  • Forty-sixth day before Easter: Ash Wednesday – Fast
  • Sunday before Easter: Palm Sunday of the Lord's Passion – Solemnity
  • Thursday before Easter: Holy Thursday – Solemnity
  • Friday before Easter: Good Friday – Fast
  • Sunday after the first full moon occurring after 20 March: Easter – Solemnity
  • First Sunday after Easter: The Feast of Divine Mercy (also known as Divine Mercy Sunday)
  • Fortieth day from Easter (Thursday of the Sixth Week of Easter): Ascension of the Lord – Solemnity
  • Fiftieth day from Easter: Pentecost – Solemnity
  • First Sunday after Pentecost: Holy Trinity – Solemnity
  • Thursday after Holy Trinity: Body and Blood of Christ – Solemnity
  • Friday following the second Sunday after Pentecost: Sacred Heart of Jesus – Solemnity
  • Saturday following the second Sunday after Pentecost: Immaculate Heart of Mary – Memorial (if the date coincides with that of another Memorial, both become optional)
  • Last Sunday in Ordinary Time (last Sunday before 27 November): Christ the King – Solemnity
  • Sunday within the Octave of Christmas (or, if there is no such Sunday, 30 December): Holy Family – Feast

Epiphany is celebrated on the Sunday after 1 January, the Ascension of the Lord on the Seventh Sunday of Easter, and the Body and Blood of Christ (Corpus Christi) on the Sunday after Holy Trinity in countries where the Episcopal Conference, with the prior approval of the Apostolic See, has decided that they are not treated as Holy Days of Obligation.

"For the pastoral advantage of the people, it is permissible to observe on the Sundays in Ordinary Time those celebrations that fall during the week and have special appeal to the devotion of the faithful, provided the celebrations take precedence over these Sundays in the Table of Liturgical Days" (General Norms for the Liturgical Year and the Calendar, 58).
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January (General Calendar)
  • 1 January: Octave of Christmas, Solemnity of Mary, Mother of God – Solemnity
  • 2 January: Saints Basil the Great and Gregory Nazianzen, bishops and doctors – Memorial
  • 3 January: The Most Holy Name of Jesus – Optional Memorial
  • 6 January: Epiphany (celebrated on the first Sunday after 1 January in countries where this feast is not a Holy Day of Obligation)
  • 7 January: Saint Raymond of Penyafort, priest – Optional Memorial
  • 13 January: Saint Hilary of Poitiers, bishop and doctor – Optional Memorial
  • 17 January: Saint Anthony of Egypt, abbot – Memorial
  • 20 January: Saint Fabian, pope and martyr; or Saint Sebastian, martyr – Optional Memorial
  • 21 January: Saint Agnes, virgin and martyr – Memorial
  • 22 January: Saint Vincent, deacon and martyr – Optional Memorial
  • 24 January: Saint Francis de Sales, bishop and doctor – Memorial
  • 25 January: The Conversion of Saint Paul, apostle – Feast
  • 26 January: Saints Timothy and Titus, bishops – Memorial
  • 27 January: Saint Angela Merici, virgin – Optional Memorial
  • 28 January: Saint Thomas Aquinas, priest and doctor – Memorial
  • 31 January: Saint John Bosco, priest – Memorial

Note: The feast of the Baptism of the Lord is celebrated on the Sunday after 6 January. But whenever Epiphany falls on 7 or 8 January (only in countries where it is not a Holy Day of Obligation), the feast of the Baptism of the Lord is celebrated on the following Monday.
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Continue Reading National Calendars:
Argentina 
Australia
Brazil
Canada
Croatia
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Holiday Related to "Name Days"

"Celebrate Your Name Week is a holiday established in 1997 by which the first full week in March as a week for everyone world-wide to embrace and celebrate his or her name." This week is also a week to be reminded what "Name Days" are as well-
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England
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Lebanon
Malta
New Zealand
Philippines
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Scotland
Slovakia
Spain
Sri Lanka
United States

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