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  Healing With Ginger!
Are you celebrating one of the National Holiday?  This page will help answer many of your questions about healing and ginger!

What is Ginger? Ginger is a Spice!
"Ginger is a spice which is used for cooking and is also consumed whole as a delicacy or medicine. It is the underground stem of the ginger plant, Zingiber officinale. Its actual name is Root Ginger. However, it is commonly referred to as ginger, as the meaning is well known."  See The Spice Ginger for it's culinary use and regional uses-
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Medicinal uses
"The medical form of ginger historically was called "Jamaica ginger"; it was classified as a stimulant and carminative, and used frequently for dyspepsia and colic. It was also frequently employed to disguise the taste of medicines. Ginger is on the FDA's 'generally recognized as safe' list, though it does interact with some medications, including warfarin. Ginger is contraindicated in people suffering from gallstones as the herb promotes the release of bile from the gallbladder. Ginger may also decrease joint pain from arthritis, though studies on this have been inconsistent, and may have blood thinning and cholesterol lowering properties that may make it useful for treating heart disease."

Diarrhea
"Ginger compounds are active against a form of diarrhea which is the leading cause of infant death in developing countries. Zingerone is likely to be the active constituent against enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin-induced diarrhea."

Nausea
"Ginger has been found effective in multiple studies for treating nausea caused by seasickness, morning sickness and chemotherapy, though ginger was not found superior over a placebo for post-operative nausea."

Folk medicinal uses
"A variety of uses are suggested for ginger. Tea brewed from ginger is a folk remedy for colds. Three to four leaves of Tulsi taken along with a piece of ginger on an empty stomach is an effective cure for congestion, cough and cold. Ginger ale and ginger beer have been recommended as "stomach settlers" for generations in countries where the beverages are made, and ginger water was commonly used to avoid heat cramps in the US. Ginger has also been historically used to treat inflammation, which several scientific studies support, though one arthritis trial showed ginger to be no better than a placebo or ibuprofen for treatment of osteoarthritis. Research on rats suggests that ginger may be useful for treating diabetes."

Local uses
"In the West, powdered dried ginger root is made into capsules and sold in pharmacies for medicinal use."


Reactions
"Allergic reactions to ginger generally result in a rash, and although it's generally recognized as safe, ginger can cause heartburn, bloating, gas, belching and nausea, particularly if taken in powdered form. Unchewed fresh ginger may result in intestinal blockage, and individuals who have had ulcers, inflammatory bowel disease or blocked intestines may react badly to large quantities of fresh ginger. Ginger can also adversely affect individuals with gallstones. There are also suggestions that ginger may affect blood pressure, clotting, and heart rhythms."
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Peel removal of roots
"When certain roots (as garlic or ginger) are to be processed into pastes or powders, it may be necessairy to soak the root in water for a night. This so that the peel of the root may release. After this process, the root may be chopped up and purated inmediatly into a paste (no drying is necessairy then). To make powder however, drying is still required before the root is ground.

See also:
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Resources: This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses some material from Wikipedia/article ginger/ and other related pages. Top photo: homestead
Common Meals
BreakfastSecond Breakfast
BrunchLunchDinner  • Supper
Tea (meal) • Afternoon TeaHigh Tea
Holidays To Remember!
National Herb Week: May
National Salad Month: May
National Nutrition Month: March
World Vegetarian Day : October
Garden HolidaysNational Garden Month
Culinary Use of Ginger
"Young ginger rhizomes are juicy and fleshy with a very mild taste. They are often pickled in vinegar or sherry as a snack or just cooked as an ingredient in many dishes. They can also be stewed in boiling water to make ginger tea, to which honey is often added as a sweetener; sliced orange or lemon fruit may also be added."
Pictured: Basket of garlic & basket of ginger.
Herb & Spice Related
Spice / Common Herbs & Spices /
Herb of the year / Herbs / Indian Spices
Common Spice Mixtures /
What is a Bouquet Garni?
Cayenne Pepper / Spice Rubs
Healing / Healing Meals
Food Holidays
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