Holi Bonfire!
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Holi is also called:
Festival of Arsalon
Dolyatra (Doul Jatra)
Basanta-Utsav ("spring festival")
Dhulheti, Dhulandi or Dhulendi
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Holika Dahan: The Holi bonfire

Holika Dahan (Holi bonfire)The main emphasis of the festival is on the burning of the holy fire or Holika. The origin of the traditional lighting of Holi is attributed by some to the burning of demonesses like Holika, Holaka and Putana who represent evil, or to the burning of Madan according to others.

Traditionally a bonfire on the day of Holi, marks the symbolic anhilation of a demoness Holika the sister of demon, Hiranyakashipu, in Hindu mythology, while trying to kill, a devotee, Bhakta Prahlad .

This is akin to other festivals where effigies are burned, like Ravana Dahan on Vijayadashami (Dusshera) day, also in many other religions across the world, signifying end of dark or demonic forces, though with Holika Dahan, the effigy has now been all but vanished or present in a symbolic form, except in few areas in the Braja region, where effigies are still seen on street corners and public squares, piled on top of an assemblage wood. This set to fire after ritualistic worship, and people make pradakshina of the bonfire. The next day this victory is celebrated as the day of Dulhendi.

In some practices particularly in the UK, coconuts are thrown into the fire and then pulled out. The burnt husk of the coconut represents Holika who died in the pyre. The white inside represents Prahlad, who was still alive and unaffected by the pyre.

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See Also:
Holi
Rituals of Holi
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Resources:
This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses some material from Wikipedia/article  Holi © /  and other related pages. Top photo:
Burning of the holy fire or Holika
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