List of Winter Festivals
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This is an incomplete list of festivals and holidays that take place during the winter in the northern hemisphere, especially those commemorating the season. Many festivals of light take place in this period since the shortest day of the year in the northern hemisphere is the Winter Solstice.
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Holidays are listed in chronological order under each heading.

Buddhist
Bodhi Day: 8 December - Day of Enlightenment, celebrating the day that the historical Buddha               (Shakyamuni or Siddhartha Guatama) experienced enlightenment (also known as Bodhi).
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Celtic
  Samhain: 1 November - first day of winter in the Celtic calendar (and Celtic New Year's Day)
  Winter Solstice: 21 December-22 December - midwinter
  Imbolc: 1 February - first day of spring in the Celtic calendar
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Chinese
  Dong zhi: Winter solstice
  Signature of the Constitution of the Republic of China (Taiwan): 25 December - a secular national holiday, which due to its date is celebrated in some respects like Christmas
  Chinese New Year: (late January - early February) - considered the end of winter in the traditional Chinese calendar.
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Christian
All Saints Day: 1 November (in Western Christian churches)
Advent: four weeks prior to Christmas.
  Saint Nicholas' Day: 6 December
  Christmas Eve: 24 December
  Christmas: 25 December - Due to a fourth century arrangement to offset the pagan Roman                        Saturnalia festival, the birth of Jesus is celebrated on December 25.
  12 Days of Christmas: 25 December through 6 January
  Saint Stephen's Day: 26 December
  Saint John the Evangelist's Day: 27 December
  Holy Innocents' Day: 28 December
  Saint Sylvester's Day: 31 December
  Watch Night: 31 December
  Feast of the Circumcision: 1 January
  Feast of Fools: 1 January
  Saint Basil's Day: 1 January (Christian Orthodox) In Greece, traditionally he is the Father                           Christmas figure.
  Twelfth Night: Epiphany Eve: 5 January
  Epiphany: 6 January: the arrival of the Three Magi.
  Armenian Apoststolc Christmas: 6 January
  Eastern Orthodox Christmas: according to the Julian Calendar, 7 January
  Candlemas: 2 February
  St. Valentines Day: 14 February
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Germanic
  Modranect: or Mothers' Night, the Saxon winter solstice festival.
  Yule: the Germanic winter solstice festival
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Hindu
  Navratri:Nine-day celebration worshipping female divinity, in October or November. Culminates in Dussehra.
  Diwali:Known as the Festival of Lights, this Hindu holiday celebrates the victory of good over evil. The five-day festival is marked by ceremonies, fireworks and sweets. Women dress up and decorate their hands with henna tattoos for the melas, or fairs. Many different myths are associated with Diwali, one of which celebrates the return of Lord Rama after a 14-year exile and his defeat of the demon Ravana.
  Bhaubeej
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Jewish
  Hanukkah: Starting on 25 Kislev (Hebrew) or various dates in November or December (Gregorian) - eight day festival commemorating the miracle of the oil after the desecration of the Temple by Antiochus IV Epiphanes and his defeat in 165 BCE.
  Tu Bishvat: New Year of the Trees occurring on the 15th of Shevat, January or February.
  Purim: Occurring on 14th or 15th day of Adar, late February to March, commemorating the miraculous deliverance and victory of the Jews of the Persian Empire in the events recorded in the Book of Esther
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Muslim
  Eid ul-Adha: Starting on the 10th of Dhul Hijja, a four day holiday commemorating the Prophet         Ibrahim's willingness to sacrifice his son, Ishmael.

NOTE: The Islamic calendar is based on the moon and this festival moves with respect to the solar year. It is, however, falling in the winter in the first decade of the present [21st] Century of the common era.
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Pagan and Neo-Pagan
  Samhain: 31 October - first day of winter in the Celtic calendar (and Celtic New Year's Day)
  Yule: (Winter Solstice) - Germanic and Egyptian Pagan festival of the rebirth of the Sun
  Imbolc: (Oimelc) (1 February or 2), but traditionally the evening of (31 January)
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Andean
  Inti Raymi: Festival of the Sun in Quechua, winter solstice festival in areas of the former Inca             empire, still celebrated every June in Cuzco.
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Pastafarian
  Holiday: Around the time of Christmas, Hanukkah, and Kwanzaa, Pastafarians celebrate a                  vaguely-defined holiday named "Holiday", which doesn't take place on "a specific date so much as it is the Holiday season, itself". Because Pastafarians "reject dogma and formalism", there are no specific requirements for the holiday
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Persian
  Sadeh: A mid-winter feast to honor fire and to "defeat the forces of darkness, frost and cold". Sadé or Sada (Persian: سده) Jashn-e Sada/Sadé (in Persian: جشن سده), also transliterated as Sadeh, is an ancient Iranian tradition celebrated 50 days before nowrouz. Sadeh in Persian means "hundred" and refers to one hundred days and nights left to the beginning of the new year celebrated at the first day of spring on March 21st each year. Sadeh is a mid winter festival that was celebrated with grandeur and magnificence in ancient Iran. It was a festivity to honor fire and to defeat the forces of darkness, frost, and cold.
  Yalda: The turning point, Winter Solstice (December 21). End of the longest night of the year (Darkness), and beginning of growing of the days (Lights). A celebration of Good over Evil. Shabe Yaldā (Persian: یلدا) or Shabe Chelle (Persian: شب چله) is an Iranian festival originally celebrated on the Northern Hemisphere's longest night of the year, that is, on the eve of the Winter Solstice.
  Chahar Shanbeh Suri: Festival of Fire, Last Wednesday of the Iranian Calendar year. It marks the importance of the light over the darkness, and arrival of spring and revival of nature.
Chahārshanbe-Sūri (Persian: چهارشنبهسوری), pronounced Chārshanbe-Sūri (Persian: چارشنبهسوری) is the ancient Iranian festival dating at least back to 1700 BCE of the early Zoroastrian era. The festival of fire is a prelude to the ancient Norouz festival, which marks the arrival of spring and revival of nature. Chahrshanbeh Soori, is celebrated the last Tuesday night of the year.
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Polynesian
  Matariki: (Māori New Year, usually early June) - Rising of the Pleiades star cluster before dawn.
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Roman
  Saturnalia: the Roman winter soltice festival
  Festival of the birth of the Unconquered Sun: late Roman Empire - 25 December
  Lupercalia, the Roman end-of-winter festival - 15 February
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Secular
  Winterval: Secular name for winter festivities coined by Birmingham City Council to encompass            all holidays being recognized from October to January
  Zamenhof Day: (15 December) - Birthday of Ludwig Zamenhof, inventor of Esperanto; holiday                reunion for Esperantists
  Winter Solstice, Yule: (21 December or 22 December) (Late June weekend in Australia) -                            Celebration of the Winter Solstice.
  HumanLight: (23 December) - Humanist holiday originated by the New Jersey Humanist                           Network
  Chrismukkah: Slang term for the amalgam of Christmas and Hanukkah celebrated by religiously             mixed families and couples
  Yuletide: (25 December) - Classic and modern, respectively, terms for the social and federal                      December 25th holiday
  Boxing Day: (26 December) - Gift-giving day after Christmas.
  Noob Day: December 26 - The day following Christmas when all the people who received online            games as gifts go online for the first time and are killed off or mocked by veterans. This carries               on the old concept of "Christmas greenies" from the 1980s, when computer BBSes would be                       flooded by greenies (new users) who had just received their first modem as gifts.
  Kwanzaa: (26 December - 1 January) - Pan-African festival
  Yulefest, Midwinter Christmas (around late June or July) - Australian New Zealand winter                       'Christmas/Yuletide'
  New Year's Eve: (31 December) - Last day of the Gregorian year
  Hogmanay: (Night of 31 December - Before dawn of 1 January) - Scottish New Years Eve                           Celebration
  New Year's Day: (1 January) - First day of the Gregorian year
  Burns Night: (25 January) - Birthday of Robert Burns
  Groundhog Day: (2 February)
  Quebec City Winter Carnival: (February) - Annual celebration of winter.
  Fur Rondy: (Late February and early March]) - Winter celebration in Anchorage, Alaska
  Festival du Voyageur: February winter celebration of the fur trade in Winnipeg, Manitoba.
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Slavic
  Karachun - the ancient Slavs polytheistic winter solstice festival
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See Also:
Winter Holidays
Winter Season
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Resources: This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses some material from Wikipedia/article festivals /and other related pages. Top Photo:
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