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Marzipan is a confection consisting primarily of sugar or honey and almond meal, sometimes augmented with almond oil or extract. It is often made into sweets; common uses are marzipan-filled chocolate and small marzipan imitations of fruits and vegetables.
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National Marzipan Day
Marzipan is a confection consisting primarily of sugar or honey and almond meal, sometimes augmented with almond oil or extract. It is often made into sweets; common uses are marzipan-filled chocolate and small marzipan imitations of fruits and vegetables. It is also rolled into thin sheets and glazed for icing cakes, primarily birthday and wedding cakes and Christmas cakes. 
Popular Holidays
Everybody needs to enjoy the holidays!
Origin of this Holiday
Our research did not find the creator, or the origin of this day.
Why the month of January and why the 12th day??  That's the question...
This holiday is referred to as a "National" day as all food and drink holidays are.  However, we did not find any congressional records or presidential proclamations for this day. Even though we didn't, this is still a food holiday that is publicized to celebrate.

We found  recognition from...
calendar sites and personal Internet sites that blog and share information about this holiday. We also found reference to this day on food related websites and baker websites since marzipan is considered a dessert.
food.com - yumsugar - examiner.com - almanacofeats.com -
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Marzipan around the world
This use is particularly common in England, on large fruitcakes. Marzipan (or almond paste) may also be used as a cake ingredient, as in stollen. In some countries, it is shaped into small figures of animals as a traditional treat for New Year's Day. Marzipan is also used in Tortell, and in some versions of king cake eaten during the Carnival season. Traditional Swedish Princess Cake is typically covered with a layer of marzipan that has been tinted pale green.
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If you are new to this holiday:
If you are new to this holiday; then maybe you would like to find more information. We found that Amazon.com is a popular Internet Site for finding books and supplies.

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How can I Celebrate this holiday?

  • Host a marzipan making party! Marzipan rolled and shaped like fruit and animals are very popular. Assign each guest a fruit or animal to make. If you invited 4 guest then have each person form 4 shapes. Supply the ingredients to your guest and have fun. Other supplies would be gloves to wear while forming the shapes. Provide a small food box to all your guest so everyone can take home marzipan.
  • Take the kids to the local candy shop and show them what professional marzipan looks like. Then buy a sample and have a taste.
  • Ask the girls over for cake and coffee. Make sure you place a marzipan critter on the side of their coffee cup or on top of their slice of cake.
  • Marzipan is soooo popular at tea parties! Marzipan is used to decorate the top of fancy cookies or rolled out to top fancy cupcakes. Give it a try!
  • Treat your best friend with a box of unformed marzipan in different colors so she can do with it as she pleases.
  • Send Free Internet Invitations!  -  If your ready to get together with your friends don't forget to invite them by email with these fun Internet Invitations. They are always fun & FREE!
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Marzipan Around The World

Southern Europe
In Italy, particularly in Palermo, marzipan (marzapane) is often shaped and painted with food colorings to resemble fruit—Frutta martorana—especially during the Christmas season and on Il Giorno dei Morti (All Souls' Day) on November 2. May 9 and 10 are also special days for eating marzipan in Sicily. In Portugal, where the confection has been made by nuns since olden times,[vague][3] traditional marzipan (maçapão) fruit-shaped sweets made in the Algarve region are called morgadinhos. There are other regions, as Toledo in Spain in which marzipan is shaped into simple animal shapes, and usually filled in with egg yolk (yema) and sugar. In Greece and Cyprus, marzipan is made in a variety of shapes and sizes and is almost always left white. In the islands of the Aegean in particular, white marzipan is considered a wedding treat and is served to guests at wedding feasts.

New World
In Latin American cuisine, marzipan is known by the Castillian word of mazapán and is also traditionally eaten at Christmas, though mazapán is generally made with peanuts in place of almonds.

Northern Europe
In the Netherlands and Belgium, Marzipan figures are given as presents to children during Saint Nicholas's Eve. In Germany, it is common to give marzipan in the shape of a pig as new year presents, known as a Glücksschwein ("lucky pig"). In Norway it's common to eat marzipan shaped as pigs for Christmas, and shaped as eggs for Easter. In Geneva, a traditional part of the celebration of L'Escalade is the ritual smashing of a chocolate cauldron filled with marzipan vegetables, a reference to a Savoyard siege of the city which was supposedly foiled by a housewife with a cauldron of boiling soup.

Middle East
In the Middle East, marzipan (known as lozina, which is derived from the word لوز lawz, the Arabic word for almonds) is flavored with orange-flower water and shaped into roses and other delicate flowers before they are baked. Marzipan can also be made from oatmeal, farina, or semolina. In Iran, marzipan fruit is a traditional Passover treat, replacing cookies and cakes.

South and East Asia
In the Indian state of Goa, the Goan Catholic dish Mazpon replaces almonds with cashew nuts. In the Philippines, mazapán de pili (Spanish for "pili marzipan") is made from pili nuts.
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You may also want to research:
  • almond paste
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National Marzipan Day is celebrated annually on January 12th in the United States.
Above we learned about National Marzipan Day but did you know that January has many more holidays and observances just waiting for you to celebrate? Yep! Just follow our links to learn all about them.
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