Passover Date and Duration
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Passover
facts gathered by: Pam - gone-ta-pott.com
see resources, outside links & further reading / wikipedia / thefreedictionary
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This featured article is about Passover,  a Religious holiday (Christian Holiday) and one of the three Pilgrim Festivals. It is in honor of Jewish Holidays and is related to Shavuot ("Festival of Weeks") which follows 49 days from the second night of Passover.
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  • Official name Hebrew: פסח (Pesach)
  • Observed by: Jews. Also observed by Samaritans, some Christians including Malayali Nasrani Christians, Knanaya and followers of Messianic Judaism.
  • Type:One of the Three Pilgrim Festivals
  • Significance: Celebrates the Exodus, the freedom from slavery of the Children of Israel from ancient Egypt that followed the Ten Plagues.
  • Beginning of the 49 days of Counting of the Omer

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The Passover begins on the 15th day of the month of Nisan, which typically falls in March or April of the Gregorian calendar. Passover is a spring festival, so the 15th day of Nisan begins on the night of a full moon after the northern vernal equinox. To ensure that Passover did not start before spring, the tradition in ancient Israel held that the first day of Nisan would not start until the barley was ripe, being the test for the onset of spring. If the barley was not ripe, or various other phenomena indicated that spring was not yet imminent, an intercalary month (Adar II) would be added. However, since at least the 4th century, the date has been fixed mathematically.

In Israel, Passover is the seven-day holiday of the Feast of Unleavened Bread, with the first and last days observed as legal holidays and as holy days involving abstention from work, special prayer services, and holiday meals; the intervening days are known as Chol HaMoed ("Weekdays [of] the Festival"). Diaspora Jews historically observed the festival for eight days, and most still do. Reform and Reconstructionist Jews and Israeli Jews, wherever they are, usually observe the holiday over seven days. The reason for this extra day is due to enactment of the ancient Jewish sages.[citation needed] It is thought by many scholars that Jews outside of Israel could not be certain if their local calendars fully conformed to practice of the Temple at Jerusalem, so they added an extra day. But as this practice only attaches to certain (major) sacred days, others posit the extra day may have been added to accommodate people who had to travel long distances to participate in communal worship and ritual practices; or the practice may have evolved as a compromise between conflicting interpretations of Jewish Law regarding the calendar; or it may have evolved as a safety measure in areas where Jews were commonly in danger, so that their enemies would not be certain on which day to attack.

Karaites and Samaritans use different versions of the Jewish calendar, which are often out of sync with the modern Jewish calendar by one or two days.[citation needed] In 2009, for example, Nisan 15 on the Jewish calendar used by Rabbinic Judaism corresponds to April 9. On the calendars used by Karaites and Samaritans, Abib or Aviv 15 (as opposed to 'Nisan') corresponds to April 11 in 2009. The Karaite and Samaritan Passovers are each one day long, followed by the six day Festival of Unleavened Bread – for a total of seven days.

Continue Reading about Passover:

  • Passover (Christian Holiday)
  • You are here - Date and duration
  • Etymology
  • Passover offering, korban Pesach
  • Search for, and burning of leaven
  • Matzah
  • Passover seder
  • Participation of children
  • Hol Hamoed
  • Counting of the Omer
  • Seventh day of Passover
  • Second Passover
  • Passover Traditional Foods
  • Sermons, liturgy, and song
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You may also want to Research:

  •   Jewish Calendar
  •   Fast of the Firstborn
  •   Gebrochts
  •   Haggadah of Pesach
  •   Jewish greetings
  •   Kitniyot
  •   Passover (Christian holiday)
  •   Passover Seder
  •   Passover Seder Plate
  •   Quartodecimanism
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