Rituals Of Holi!
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Holi is also called:
Festival of Arsalon
Dolyatra (Doul Jatra)
Basanta-Utsav ("spring festival")
Dhulheti, Dhulandi or Dhulendi
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Rituals
"Earliest textual references regarding celebration of Holi have been found the 7th century Sanskrit drama, Ratnavali. Holi has certainly perennial rituals attached to it, the first is smearing of coloured powder on each other, and throwing water, coloured and scented using pichkaris, shaped like giant syringes or squirt guns. Though the festival really begins many days in advance, with 'Holi Milan' or Baithaks, musical soirees, where song related to the festival, and the epic love story of Radha Krishna are sung; specially type of folk songs, known as “Hori” are sung as well. Some classical ones like Aaj biraj mein Holi re rasiya, have been present in the folklore for many generations."

Food
"Food preparations also begin many days in advance, with assemblage of gujia, papads, kanji and various kinds of snack items including malpuas, mathri, puran poli, dahi badas, which are served to Holi guests. The night of Holi, the baithak turn into event of churning bhang ( cannabis) to make intoxicating milk shakes.

Dulhendi
"Principal ingredients of celebration are Abeer and Gulal, in all possible colours. Next comes squirting of coloured water using pichkaris. Coloured water is prepared using Tesu flowers, which are first gathered from the trees, dried in the sun, and then ground up, and later mixed with water to produce orange-yellow coloured water. Another traditional Holi item now rarely seen is a where a red powder enclosed in globes of Lakh, which break instantly and covering the party with the powder."
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Traditional Holi
"Flowers of Dhak or Palash are used to make traditional colours.

The spring season, during which the weather changes, is believed to
cause viral fever and cold. Thus, the playful throwing of natural
coloured powders has a medicinal significance: the colours are
traditionally made of Neem, Kumkum, Haldi, Bilva, and other
medicinal herbs prescribed by Āyurvedic doctors.

Special Drink
"A special drink called thandai is prepared (commonly made of almonds, pistachious,rose petals etc), sometimes containing bhang (Cannabis sativa). For wet colours, traditional flowers of Palash are boiled and soaked in water over night to produced yellow coloured water, which also had medicinal properties. Unfortunately the commercial aspect of celebration has led to an increase in the use of synthetic colours which, in some cases, may be toxic."

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Holi is also called Festival of Arsalon

Observed by:
Indians (Hindus, Sikhs,Buddhists and Jains)
almost all Nepalese (mainly Hindus and a fair number of Buddhists)

Begins: Phalgun Purnima or Pooranmashi (Full Moon)
Date: February - March
Celebrations: 3 - 16 days

See Also:
Holi
Holi Bonfire

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Resources:
This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses some material from Wikipedia/article  Holi © /  and other related pages. Top photo: holicelebration
Holi Celebration!