Saying Grace:  continued
Gone-ta-pott.com
Gone-ta-pott.com
A place to discover Holidays
   you didn't know existed!
Holiday Cookbooks
Photo Loading: 
Featured Articles & Recipes:
Follow Me on Pinterest
Follow on Twitter
Find on Facebook
Our Pinterest
Our Blog
Religious Holidays
Send Free Greeting
Steak & Mushroom Salsa
Dinner Parties
Types of Hamburgers
Movable Feast
How To Pray
Barbecue Breakfast
Thanksgiving
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Traditional
Holiday Foods
Prayer
Barbecue & Grilling
Grilled Satay
Potato Chip Cookies
Pig Pickin
This article honors the holiday calendar which is packed full of food observances and holidays that's known for delicious food. Enjoy reading as we give you a varieties of featured recipes, articles and tips just for celebrating the holidays. Just like this article about grace.
.........................................................................................................................................................................
.........................................................................................................................................................................
Resources: This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses some material from Wikipedia/ article or photos /and other related pages. Top Photo credit: homestead
.........................................................................................................................................................................
Navigation:
Grace is a name for any of a number of short prayers said or an unvoiced intention held prior to or after eating, thanking God and/or the entities that have given of themselves to furnish nutrients to those partaking in the meal. Some traditions hold that grace and thanksgiving imparts a blessing which sanctifies the meal. In the English language tradition, reciting a prayer prior to eating is traditionally referred to as "saying grace".

Saying Grace... continued from here

Islamic grace

In Islam, the concept of grace stems from the fact that each individual is responsible for their own fates. Hence, before beginning a meal, Muslims recite the Basmala individually, in the belief that while coming as one during congregation, believers enter and leave this world alone. Some will respond by continuing with " 'Al hamdu lil 'llah, rabi l'alamin."

At the end of meals it is customary to say " 'Al humdu lil Allahil lazi at'amanaa wasaqaana waja'alana minal muslimeen" ("Praise to Allah for feeding us, giving us to drink and making us muslims").
.........................................................................................................................................................................

Baha'i Grace

The Baha'i Faith has these two prayers:

  • "He is God! Thou seest us, O my God, gathered around this table, praising Thy bounty, with our gaze set upon Thy Kingdom. O Lord! Send down upon us Thy heavenly food and confer upon us Thy blessing. Thou art verily the Bestower, the Merciful, the Compassionate."

  • "He is God! How can we render Thee thanks, O Lord? Thy bounties are endless and our gratitude cannot equal them. How can the finite utter praise of the Infinite? Unable are we to voice our thanks for Thy favors and in utter powerlessness we turn wholly to Thy Kingdom beseeching the increase of Thy bestowals and bounties. Thou art the Giver, the Bestower, the Almighty."
.........................................................................................................................................................................

Hindu Grace

Hindus use the 24th verse of the 4th chapter of Bhagavad Gita as the traditional prayer or blessing before a meal. Once the food is blessed it becomes Prasad, or sanctified as holy

Brahmaarpanam Brahma Havir
Brahmaagnau Brahmanaa Hutam
Brahmaiva Tena Gantavyam
Brahma Karma Samaadhinaha

Which translates as 'The act of offering is God (Brahma), the oblation is God, By God it is offered into the fire of God, God is That which is to be attained by him who sees God in all.'

Sometimes, the 14th verse from the 15th chapter of Bhagavad Gita is used:

Aham Vaishvaanaro Bhutva
Praaninaam Dehamaashritha
Praanaapaana Samaa Yuktaha
Pachaamyannam Chatur Vidam

This translates as 'Becoming the life-fire in the bodies of living beings, mingling with the upward and downward breaths, I digest the four kinds of food.'

Traditional Maharashtrian grace invokes the Lord through the shloka of Sant Ramdas namely:

vadani kaval gheta naam ghya shri-hariche l sahaj havan hote naam gheta phukache l jivan kari jivitva anna he purn-brahma l udar-bharan nohe janije yadnya-karma ll 1 ll

jani bhojani naam vache vadave l ati aadare gadya-ghoshe mhanave l harichintane anna sevit jaave l tari srihari pavijeto swabhave ll 2 ll

This translates as: Take the name of the Lord when putting a morsel into your mouth.
.........................................................................................................................................................................

Other pre-meal sayings
This section needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (May 2013)

In Japan it is customary to put one's hands together and say "Itadakimasu" (いただきます?) ("I humbly receive") before eating a meal. "Itadakimasu" is said to express gratitude for all people who played a role in preparing, cultivating or hunting the food.

In Korea, it is customary to say "Jal meokgesseumnida" (잘 먹겠습니다) ("I will eat well'). The saying is not religious in nature, and usually only occurs when eating with someone else.

In humanist and secular gatherings, someone may give thanks to all the people responsible for them being together and having food.

In certain Boy Scout circles, especially in Missouri, the "S-F" grace (named after the S-F Scout Ranch in Knob Lick, Missouri) is often said, especially when people at the table are of mixed religions. The S-F grace gives thanks to a "great Spirit", but is not affiliated with any one religion.

Another common Boy Scout grace is the "Philmont Grace" (named after the Philmont Scout Ranch in New Mexico) or the "Wilderness Grace". It can be found in use wherever a troop has gone to Philmont, but is most common in the Western half of the United States. It goes: " For food, for raiment, / For life, for opportunities, / For friendship and fellowship, / We thank thee, O Lord."

In households where religion is not taken seriously, children may say parodies of grace, such as: "Two, four, six, eight, bog in, don't wait. Nine, ten, amen," "Good food, good meat, good God, let's eat," or "Rub-a-dub dub, thanks for the grub, yay God!"
.........................................................................................................................................................................

► Continue reading for resources
........................................................................................